Category: My life

Movember 2014 is over, thanks for your support!

With more than 2,400€ collected, our team – Bordet’s angels – can be proud, for a first participation! We are 12th of more than 100 Belgian teams. One key learning is that the gold, old paper display still works better than anything else to raise money.

And it was fun for me, a bit itchy in the end. But with the right trimming tools, this goes away very quickly. Thanks for all my supporters 😉 – your support is worth a thousand thank-you!

And a bonus video that was fun to create …

Nearly halfway through Movember

We’re nearly halfway through Movember, the month we grow our moustache in order to raise awareness about men’s health. I am in Amsterdam, for a congress and this was the hardest day of the month so far: since 8am, nearly every single person I met said it didn’t look good. And this can be harsh when you talk with (potential) business partners! However, practically, when you have time, this is an unique opportunity to initiate discussions with others about prostate cancer.

So this is a plea to make it worth! Please donate to prostate cancer research via my profile page: http://mobro.co/jepoirrier. Belgian men lives on average 5 years less than Belgian women. Belgium has the 4th highest cancer rate for men diagnosed in 2012 worldwide. Survival rates are however good but together we can do better!

Still want to see how it looks like so far? Here you see I will soon need to use wax, scissors and all sorts of precision instruments to tame it 😉

Movember moustache Jean-Etienne Poirrier

And if you are still not convinced, here is a short interview of professor Swinnen, from KUL (in Belgium), about his research and how Movember is helping his team:

And again, donate to a good cause! Many thanks in advance for your help!

Will we see more babies named George in England and Wales?

A few days ago Prince William and Duchess Catherine of Cambridge gave birth to Prince George. Today at the office we were wondering if we will see more babies names George in UK. Very important question indeed!

So I went to the UK National Statistics website and looked for baby names in UK. Let’s focus on England and Wales only. There are two datasets for what we are looking for: one for the period 1904-1994 (by 10 years steps) and one for 2004 (if we want to be consistent with the 10 years step in the first dataset). I extracted the ranking relevant for us here: for babies called William, George (and Harry, William’s brother). The data is here.

If we plot these rankings we see for William that there could be a “Prince effect”. Indeed this name was less and less used in the 20th century (blue dots) until Prince William’s birth in 1982 (blue dotted line). Idem for the name Harry (green dots) that didn’t even made it into the top 100 in 1964, 1974 and 1984 ; but it reappeared at the 30th rank in 1994 (he was born in 1984, green dotted line).

Evolution of ranking of baby name popularity - William, Harry and GeorgeNow for the name George, it’s a bit different. The name was also going down the ranking until 1974 when it reached the 83rd rank. After that it went up again. So does it invalidate the “Prince effect” mentioned earlier? Maybe it’s more a “famous effect” since other famous Georges were famous (George Michael, George Clooney, George Best, George Weasley, … from Yahoo!). Maybe the appearance of television shows in colour (1966 for BBC) made this name popular? Do you see other reason? But even from the already high 17th in popularity now I still expect the name George to gain even more popularity.

Btw I discovered that The Guardian ran a similar story (excluding Harry however).

Any free solution for the demise of Google Reader?

Last week Google announced it will shut down its Reader service. It is a web-based RSS reader. It therefore allows to be kept updated of news from around the net in a central location. I liked the service for 3 reasons (on top of the fact it’s free, 0$, to use):

  1. It’s web-based, accessible from anywhere/everywhere with a simple browser;
  2. It’s text-based, you can quickly scan headlines and use the powerful search function from Google;
  3. It’s backed by an API so you can use it via different apps on different platforms and they all stay synchronised (the web/mobile version of Reader is not as efficient as the web/desktop version; hence the proliferation of apps using Reader as a backbone).

Of course it frustrated a lot of people, from scientists to consultants … to name a few only. People are looking for alternative (you can do a search on Google while the Search service is still working). Feedly is cited very often as the next best alternative. However its nice, graphical interface conflicts with my second reason to like Google Reader: it’s text-based. The Old Reader looks also interesting, it is text-based but no apps on different platforms yet. But both are also proprietary and can be turned off (or changed to a pay-for-use model) at any moment 😦

An interesting solution could be an Evernote RSS reader. Evernote has already a portfolio of application ranging from a note-taking software, screenshots, drawing, food, … They have a synchronisation process in place. Why not a RSS reader then?

Back to the main track … Fortunately – in a way – Google Takeout allows you to retrieve all your data from Reader, along with an OPML file containing all your subscriptions. You can feed this file in another reader and you can go forward. Starred items are also retrieved (but which reader can use them?). And if you are interested The Guardian has an interesting article about the average duration of Google free services (1459 days, see below) and other nice facts. I guess they will keep Search alive 😉

130325-Google_Keep_Guardian

But what can be done for free (as in free speech)? One of the solution is Owncloud (AGPL) and they recently released a RSS reader add-on. Another solution could be pyAggr3g470r, a news aggregator written in Python. And I was wondering why there isn’t just a simple API that would allow any kind of application to connect, update and display RSS feed. Something like the NewsCredNews API but free, simpler to use than Owncloud and with apps/website interface for mobile devices. And a poney with that, please.

Do you have any other solution?

Map of GAVI eligible countries in R

I was trying to reproduce the map of the GAVI Alliance eligible countries (btw I was surprised India is eligible – but that’s the beauty of relying on numbers only and not assumptions) in R. This is the original map (there are 57 countries eligible):

map_GAVI-eligible_countries_700x315_700

I started to use the R package rworldmap because it seemed the most appropriate for this task. Everything went fine. Most of the time was spent converting the list of countries from plain English to plain “ISO3” code as required (ISO3 is in fact ISO 3166-1 alpha-3). I took my source from Wikipedia.

Well, that was until joinCountryData2Map gave me this reply:

54 codes from your data successfully matched countries in the map
3 codes from your data failed to match with a country code in the map
189 codes from the map weren’t represented in your data

I should have better simply read the documentation: there is another small command that needs not to be overlooked, rwmGetISO3. What are the three codes that failed to match?

Although you can compare visually the map produced with the map above, R (and rworldmap) can indirectly give you the culprits:

tC2 = matrix(c("Afghanistan", "Bangladesh", "Benin", "Burkina Faso", "Burundi", "Cambodia", "Cameroon", "Central African Republic", "Chad", "Comoros", "Congo, Dem Republic of", "Côte d'Ivoire", "Djibouti", "Eritrea", "Ethiopia", "Gambia", "Ghana", "Guinea", "Guinea Bissau", "Haiti", "India", "Kenya", "Korea, DPR", "Kyrgyz Republic", "Lao PDR", "Lesotho", "Liberia", "Madagascar", "Malawi", "Mali", "Mauritania", "Mozambique", "Myanmar", "Nepal", "Nicaragua", "Niger", "Nigeria", "Pakistan", "Papua New Guinea", "Rwanda", "São Tomé e Príncipe", "Senegal", "Sierra Leone", "Solomon Islands", "Somalia", "Republic of Sudan", "South Sudan", "Tajikistan", "Tanzania", "Timor Leste", "Togo", "Uganda", "Uzbekistan", "Viet Nam", "Yemen", "Zambia", "Zimbabwe"), nrow=57, ncol=1)
apply(tC2, 1, rwmGetISO3)

In the results, some countries are actually given in a slightly different way by GAVI than in R. For instance “Congo, Dem Republic of” should be changed for rworldmap in “Democratic Republic of the Congo” (ISO3 code: COD). Or “Côte d’Ivoire” should be changed for rworldmap in “Ivory Coast” (ISO3 code: CIV). An interesting resource for country names recognised by rworld map is the UN Countries or areas, codes and abbreviations. Once you correct this, you can have your map of GAVI-eligible countries:

GAVIcountries-eligibles-map3-jepoirrier

And here is the code:

# Displays map of GAVI countries
library(rworldmap)
theCountries <- c("AFG", "BGD", "BEN", "BFA", "BDI", "KHM", "CMR", "CAF", "TCD", "COM", "COD", "CIV", "DJI", "ERI", "ETH", "GMB", "GHA", "GIN", "GNB", "HTI", "IND", "KEN", "PRK", "KGZ", "LAO", "LSO", "LBR", "MDG", "MWI", "MLI", "MRT", "MOZ", "MMR", "NPL", "NIC", "NER", "NGA", "PAK", "PNG", "RWA", "STP", "SEN", "SLE", "SLB", "SOM", "SDN", "SSD", "TJK", "TZA", "TLS", "TGO", "UGA", "UZB", "VNM", "YEM", "ZMB", "ZWE")
GaviEligibleDF <- data.frame(country = c("AFG", "BGD", "BEN", "BFA", "BDI", "KHM", "CMR", "CAF", "TCD", "COM", "COD", "CIV", "DJI", "ERI", "ETH", "GMB", "GHA", "GIN", "GNB", "HTI", "IND", "KEN", "PRK", "KGZ", "LAO", "LSO", "LBR", "MDG", "MWI", "MLI", "MRT", "MOZ", "MMR", "NPL", "NIC", "NER", "NGA", "PAK", "PNG", "RWA", "STP", "SEN", "SLE", "SLB", "SOM", "SDN", "SSD", "TJK", "TZA", "TLS", "TGO", "UGA", "UZB", "VNM", "YEM", "ZMB", "ZWE"),
GAVIeligible = c(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1))
GAVIeligibleMap <- joinCountryData2Map(GaviEligibleDF, joinCode = "ISO3", nameJoinColumn = "country") mapCountryData(GAVIeligibleMap, nameColumnToPlot="GAVIeligible", catMethod = "categorical", missingCountryCol = gray(.8))

Android is catching up iOS

121221-android-mba-rWell, there is nothing new in this statement. The smartphone OS Android is catching up and even overtaking its rival iOS in many domains:

  • more activated products per day and per year in 2011,
  • more Samsung Galaxy S3 (running Android) sold in Q3 2012 than iPhone4 and 5S (running iOS),
  • more devices worldwide,
  • catching up Apple’s market share in tablets,

All this is summarised in an infographics MBA Online designed (the original address is here: http://www.mbaonline.com/android/click at your own risk). It is sweet and colorful, with lots of numbers and some references in the end. Unfortunately these references are embedded in the image so you cannot click on them if you ever want to read more info.

Also as I mentioned previously (for an infographics coming from a similar type of website), I didn’t like much the fact it was very, very long (see reduced copy on the right). It makes things easily read while scrolling down. But ymmv I would have like something a bit more different. For instance I would have seen this more as a succession of slides, a-la Pechakucha maybe (except there is a lot of text). But the restrictive license (CC-by-nc-nd) prohibits derivative works.

So I like my Android device. I like when people promote it, are proud that Android is a success and talk about it. And the web is full of these infographics: a similar story about taking over the world, the successive Android versions (again very long), tastes of Android users (versus iOS users’), a broader smartphone comparison (again very long), a Google search for it, … Choose the one you like!